Finishing School Orientation (Extended): Brenda Zhang

Throughout the run of The Taming of the Shrew, a dynamic lineup of special events will offer everyone a chance to live in the world of the production. Designed to look like the open-air markets of Padua and curated to appeal to savvy, contemporary customers, the Piazza d’Amore will host unique shopping, show-related discussions, special performances and culinary events. At the same time, Padua Finishing School will offer artistic workshops that encourage life-long learners to explore new things. The workshops …

Continue reading

Stories Voiced: Austin

Subscribe/Listen to STC’s podcasts on iTunes Subscribe/Listen to STC’s podcasts on SoundCloud In this week’s Stories Voiced, STC’s Associate Director of Marketing Austin Auclair tells a story about the time when the police mistook him for a high-schooler—at 26 years old.

Drewmaturgy: Seasons Change

Drewmaturgy

Seasons’ Change Ahh, the season. So many events in our lives, as worker bees in the humdrum hivemind of the American regional theatre, revolve around the season. At almost every point in the year, in nonprofit offices around the country, there will be groups of theatre people getting coffee and discussing the season, arguing about the season, taking stands on the season. It is our salvation and our penance, our alpha and our omega, our sursum corda and our shalom. …

Continue reading

Letter to our patrons: The Taming of the Shrew

Dear Friend, In my opinion, Shakespeare wrote The Taming of the Shrew as a genre comedy that just happened to involve the “taming” of a young wife. He was working from a pre-made plot, common at the time, and incorporating comic conventions that called for disguise and marital transaction. There was no need to be psychological about Kate’s conversion at the end of the play, or to provide Bianca and her suitors with realistic motives for their intrigues. But ever …

Continue reading

Director’s Word: Ed Sylvanus Iskandar

I am determined to look Kate’s last speech square in the eye. It is one of the most symmetrical, beautifully composed pieces of rhetoric in all of Shakespeare, and I have never seen it performed without irony or subtext. And it isn’t ironic. It is the sound of someone who is smooth, composed and gracefully iambic; not someone putting on a show. I also knew that, for me to honor that speech properly, it had to be with a male …

Continue reading

The Taming of the Thing

by Gary Taylor When is a person a commodity? When is a human being a thing that can be bought, sold, owned, loaned, inventoried, marketed, discounted and (in cases of loss or depreciation) written off as a tax deduction? The Taming of the Shrew forces us to ask those questions, and many modern readers and spectators dislike the answers that the play offers. But when exactly did we become modern enough to be dissatisfied? Way back in 1897, George Bernard …

Continue reading

Mapping the Play: Discovering Kate with Maulik Pancholy

By Hannah Hessel Ratner The Taming of the Shrew: the infamous title sets up certain expectations for the audience.  It is up to directors and actors to decide how they want to defy those expectations. With Maulik Pancholy as Kate, the so-called shrew, this production takes a fresh perspective on a notorious role. Pancholy may be familiar from his work on television, most notably his recurring characters on 30 Rock and Weeds, but his stage work is vast. His classical …

Continue reading

Faces and Voices: Finishing School Orientation

By Catherine Shook Throughout the run of this production, a dynamic lineup of special events will offer everyone a chance to live in the world of Shrew. Designed to look like the open-air markets of Padua and curated to appeal to savvy, contemporary customers, the Piazza d’Amore will host unique shopping, show-related discussions, special performances and culinary events. At the same time, Padua Finishing School will offer artistic workshops that encourage life-long learners to explore new things.  To help orient …

Continue reading

About the Play: Shrewd Ambiguities

By Drew Lichtenberg, Literary Manager There is perhaps no Shakespeare play that has come down to us in more damaged condition than The Taming of the Shrew. Scholars agree that the play was among Shakespeare’s earliest, written before the plague closed theatres from the early 1590s to 1594. Not yet a member of the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, Shakespeare was an aspiring young freelancer, acting in, writing and selling plays to the highest bidder. A version of the play, The Taming …

Continue reading

About the Artist: Ed Sylvanus Iskandar, Social Director

By Laura Henry Buda In an industry where originality and vision are basic requirements, Ed Sylvanus Iskandar truly stands out. When STC Artistic Director Michael Kahn saw Iskandar’s production of The Mysteries, featuring 50 plays by 48 authors with 53 actors in the tiny performance space of the Flea Theater in New York, he was impressed. “The work quite frankly blew my mind,” Kahn says, “as it did for everyone who came to see it.” Soon after, Kahn invited Iskandar …

Continue reading